Wet laser labels

Gregory Zolnerowich gzolner at ACS.TAMU.EDU
Fri May 3 08:55:14 CDT 1996


Steve Halford wrote:

Laser printer inks are *supposed* to be okay,  but the technology hasn't
been around long enough to be sure.  I prefer printing labels on plain
paper and photocopying them onto archival grade stock.  (Some workers
have advocated using impact printers with cloth ribbons -- the ribbon is
cleared of its commercial ink in an alcohol bath, then re-impregnated
with Higgin's Eternal (R),  the *ink* of record for wet collections.)

Steve (halford at sfu.ca) Museum Technician
Simon Fraser University



I printed some locality labels on Byron-Weston linen label paper on
17.II.1989 using an Apple Laserwriter. The labels were placed in a
neoprene-stoppered vial containing 70% ethanol and left on a shelf indoors.
Looking at the labels today, whole letters or large portions of letters
have flaked off of the paper, rendering some words unreadable. Because the
ink sits on top of the paper instead of impregnating it, such labels should
not be expected to last.  Presumably, photocopying uses a similar process
and should be suspect.

Additional labels were written on 16.XI.1992 with a Pigma 01, Pigma 005,
and Alvin pen using India ink on Byron-Weston linen label paper. Each label
was stored in a neoprene-stoppered vial containing 70% ethanol and left on
a shelf indoors. Each of these labels is in perfect condition.

Greg Z.

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Dr. Gregory Zolnerowich                 gzolner at acs.tamu.edu
Dept. of Entomology                     409-862-3344 phone
Texas A&M University                    409-845-7977 fax
College Station, TX 77843-2475
USA
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