Symposium Announcement

Anne Gerber AGERBER at CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU
Wed May 1 13:16:13 CDT 1996


The Phylogeny of Life and =20
The Accomplishments of Phylogenetic Biology

A symposium at the University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA

October 11-13, 1996

Sponsored and Organized by The Research Training Group in=20
The Analysis of Biological Diversification

Overview:  The phylogeny of life represents the genealogical relation=
ships=20
among species and the broad-scale flow of genetic information through=
=20
evolutionary time.  Phylogenetic biology focuses on reconstructing th=
e=20
phylogenetic tree of life and on using it as the framework for interp=
retation=20
of evolutionary change.  The phylogenetic approach to comparative=
=20
studies has proven itself to be indispensible for unraveling and=20
comprehending life's diversification. =20
=09The RTG-sponsored symposium will be a celebration of The=20
Phylogeny of Life and Accomplishments of Phylogenetic Biology. =20
Twenty four invited participants, with collective expertise covering =
an=20
immense breadth of biological diversity and evolutionary biology, wil=
l=20
deliver platform talks over the course of five half-day sessions.  Th=
e=20
speakers will address new and long-standing general questions from ma=
ny=20
realms of biology that have benefited from or contributed to a better=
=20
understanding of phylogeny. =20
=09The symposium will also include a large contributed poster session=
=20
and an evening workshop on the Tree of Life Internet project being=
=20
organized by David R. and Wayne P. Maddison.
=09As a common theme for discussion throughout the event all=20
participants will consider the future main lines of inquiry and resea=
rch in=20
phylogenetic biology.  The symposium will conclude with an open=20
discussion of these issues.

Participants and Topics

SUSAN BARNS, Indiana Univ., Los Alamos Natl. Lab,  TBA
RICHARD BRUSCA, Univ. Charleston,  The challenge of understanding=
=20
arthropod biodiversification
SIMON CONWAY MORRIS, Cambridge Univ.,  Early Metazoan=20
radiations: what the fossil record can and cannot tell us
MICHAEL DONOGHUE, Harvard Univ.,  Advances and controversies=20
in vascular plant phylogeny
SCOTT EDWARDS, Univ. Washington,  Higher level molecular=20
systematics of birds: protein evolution and beyond
DOUGLAS ERWIN, Smithsonian Institution,  The fine structure of=20
extinction: phylogeny and mass extinction/recovery episodes
RICHARD HALLICK, Univ. Arizona,  Massive intron invasion during=20
evolution of chloroplast genes of Euglenoid protists
DAVID HILLIS, Univ. Texas,  Tests of phylogenetic hypotheses:=20
Examples from vertebrates
ELIZABETH KELLOGG, Harvard Univ.,  The Grass Menagerie: the=20
genetics of phylogenetics
ANDREW KNOLL, Harvard Univ.,  The Early Diversification of Life
LAURA LANDWEBER, Princeton Univ.,  Evolution of Complexity in=20
Genetic Systems
DAVID MADDISON, Univ. Arizona,  Tree of Life Workshop
WAYNE MADDISON, Univ. Arizona  TBA
LUCINDA MCDADE, Univ. Arizona  TBA
NANCY MORAN, Univ. Arizona, Diversification in bacterial=20
endosymbionts of insects
LISA NAGY, Univ. Arizona, Changes in arthropod morphology and the=
=20
evolution of gene regulatory networks
STUART NICHOL, Centers for Disease Control,  Changing landscapes=20
and emerging RNA viruse
MICHAEL NOVACEK, American Museum of Natural History,  The=20
burgeoning database on the higher level phylogeny of mammals
RODERICK PAGE, Univ. Glasgow,  Genes, organisms, and areas:=20
phylogeny and the study of historical associations
NICHOLAS STRAUSFELD, Univ. Arizona  TBA
ALAN TEMPLETON, Washington Univ.,  The evolution of=20
anatomically modern humans:  what do gene trees really tell us?
RYTAS VILGALYS, Duke Univ., Mycogeography: using phylogenies to=20
study the biogeography of wild mushrooms
ELIZABETH WATERS, Univ. Arizona  TBA


The registration fee includes entrance to all sessions;  the Thursday=
 night=20
mixer;  Friday night workshop and a printed copy of the abstracts fro=
m the=20
symposium, but does not include the cost of the Saturday evening=20
Banquet.  The deadline for submission of all registration materials i=
s=20
AUGUST 2, 1996.  The number of attendees is limited so please registe=
r=20
as soon as possible. =20

=09Faculty and other Professionals=09=09=09$100.00
=09Graduate students and Postdoctoral scientists=09  $50.00
=09Saturday evening Banquet=09=09=09  $15.00

Make checks payable to The University of Arizona Foundation/RTG.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ATTEND AND/OR PRESENT A POSTER: =20
You can register by mailing your check to the address below.  Registr=
ation=20
will be confirmed by mail and additional information about poster=
=20
abstracts, accommodations and travel to Tucson will be sent at that t=
ime.

You can also request this information by emailing us at: =20
RTG at ccit.arizona.edu.  Be sure to send us:
Your name:
Institution:
Mailing Address:

Please mail your registration and address any questions to: =20
Marty Wojciechowski or Anne Gerber
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Arizona
Tucson, Arizona USA  85721
FAX 520=AD621=AD9190; email: rtg at ccit.arizona.edu
Updates posted to RTG Web site: http://biodiv.arizona.edu/rtg.html.




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