Non-Sense of the Senate (U.S.)?

Peter Rauch peterr at SOCRATES.BERKELEY.EDU
Fri Jun 15 22:26:12 CDT 2001


[cross-posted from:]
>>> Posting number 5347, dated 15 Jun 2001 14:37:21
Sender: "Ecological Society of America: grants, jobs, news"
         <ECOLOG-L at UMDD.UMD.EDU>
From:    Karen Claxon <kclaxon at EARTHLINK.NET>
Subject: Fw: US Senate Passes Antievolution Resolution

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dan felps" <edrioasteroid at HOTMAIL.COM>
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2001 8:16 PM
Subject: US Senate Passes Antievolution Resolution

See the National Center for Science Education -
http://www.ncseweb.org for updates. Innocuous, yes, but this
shows how much influence the creationists have over science
education.

Sincerely,

Dan Phelps
http://www.uky.edu/OtherOrgs/KPS/

Senate Passes Antievolution Resolution
    by NCSE Staff

    On June 13, 2001, the US Senate voted a "sense of the
senate" resolution to the Elementary and Secondary Education
Act, S1, currently under consideration. The resolution
(Amendment #358)read,

    "It is the sense of the Senate that (1) good science
education should prepare students to distinguish the data or
testable theories of science from philosophical or religious
claims that are made in the name of science; and

    (2)where biological evolution is taught, the curriculum
should help students to understand why the subject generates so
much continuing controversy, and should prepare the students to
be informed participants in public discussions regarding the
subject."

    The amendment was made by Senator Santorum of Pennsylvania.

    Although the resolution appears innocuous, it is telling
that only evolution is singled out from all possible
controversial issues. If the goal of the resolution were to
encourage discussion of the social dimensions of scientific
issues, or critical thinking, or some other secular purpose, the
resolution would have read,

    "when controversial issues are taught, the curriculum should
help students to understand why the subjects generate so much
continuing controversy, and should prepare the students to be
informed participants in public discussions regarding the
subjects."

    The fact that evolution is singled out from all
controversial issues belies the bill's origin. It is doubtless
no accident that Senator Santorum cited Intelligent Design
proponent David DeWolf in presenting his resolution.




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