[Taxacom] Macroslope

Alex Borisenko aborisen at uoguelph.ca
Mon Sep 29 11:31:56 CDT 2008


Hi Neil,

"Macroslope" in its Russian meaning refers more to geography than to 
landscape characteristics (e.g., elevation patterns). With some 
reservations, it could be approximated by, say, the mountainous part of 
the entire catchment basin of a large mountain system or ridge - quite 
close to the definition outlined by Robin. As such, it will include all 
slopes and valleys pointing in the same approximate direction (e.g., 
south, west, etc.) and will disregard all the variation happening 
within, e.g., the aspects of all the 'little' slopes within it. As 
previously mentioned, this term is rather vague and intuitive and 
appears to have no strict definition - even in Russian. Despite all 
this, it has been quite operational, e.g., in characterizing the 
distribution of certain organisms or even whole communities which have 
problems penetrating through the central portion of large mountain 
systems (take the Himalayas as an example) - hence its wide usage in the 
country of origin. Apparently, English has survived without this term 
for centuries, but there seems to be no better way of translating it 
from Russian...

Best wishes,
Alex



Neil Bell wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> I notice that "microslope" also has some hits in google.
>
> Extrapolating from context, it seems that "macroslope" is used to mean 
> variation in elevation over a large area (i.e. at a course resolution), 
> while "microslope" is over a small area or at a fine resolution, i.e. 
> they are aspects of topography at different scales. Perhaps the 
> important thing is that a given point could exist on a macroslope of one 
> gradient and a microslope of another, and that both of these could be 
> independently significant?
>
> I also wondered at first whether macro/micro could refer to magnitude of 
> gradient, but this doesn't seem to be how the words are used.
>
> Neil.
>
>
>
> Alex Borisenko wrote:
>   
>> Hi Robin,
>>
>> The term 'macroslope' (in its Russian form - "макросклон") is actively 
>> used in Russian biogeographic literature in the meaning you had 
>> outlined, although there seem to be no 'official' definitions for it in 
>> any specialized Russain dictionaries (at least online), which is odd.
>> Occurrences of the English word that I was able to confirm seem to 
>> originate from papers written by Russian authors, so I do not know if 
>> this qualifies as 'legitimate' usage. That said, this is a convenient 
>> way to define parts of large mountain systems with a certain aspect, so 
>> maybe it is about time to introduce the term anyway...
>>
>> Best wishes,
>> Alex
>>
>>
>> Robin Leech wrote:
>>   
>>     
>>> Hi All,
>>>
>>> I found a Russian Geology paper that uses the word "macroslope".
>>>
>>> Volodicheva, Natalya. [no date]  #15.  The Caucasus, p. 350-376, illust.
>>>     IN: Maria Shahgedanova (ed.). The Physical Geography of Northern 
>>> Eurasia.
>>>
>>> The text mentioned above is at least 1998, and "macroslope" is used but not
>>> defined.
>>>
>>> Robin
>>>
>>> ----- Original Message ----- 
>>> From: "Frederick W Schueler" <bckcdb at istar.ca>
>>> Cc: <taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu>
>>> Sent: Sunday, September 28, 2008 2:46 PM
>>> Subject: Re: [Taxacom] Macroslope
>>>
>>>
>>>   
>>>     
>>>       
>>>> Kleo Pullin wrote:
>>>>
>>>>     
>>>>       
>>>>         
>>>>> A while ago I came across this word in a beautiful book about Siberian 
>>>>> tigers.  The book is, "Riding the Tiger: Tiger Conservation in 
>>>>> Human-Dominated Landscapes," edited by Richard Burge, John Seidensticker, 
>>>>> Sarah Christie, Peter Jackson.   John Seidensticker is a big cat 
>>>>> conservationist at the Smithsonian and might know the word or know which 
>>>>> of the Russian authors of the papers to ask.
>>>>>
>>>>>       
>>>>>         
>>>>>           
>>>> * google gives 1080 hits, in many of which it's used as if it were a
>>>> routine English word.
>>>>
>>>> fred.
>>>> ------------------------------------------------------------
>>>>             Bishops Mills Natural History Centre
>>>>           Frederick W. Schueler & Aleta Karstad
>>>>        RR#2 Bishops Mills, Ontario, Canada K0G 1T0
>>>>     on the Smiths Falls Limestone Plain 44* 52'N 75* 42'W
>>>>       (613)258-3107 <bckcdb at istar.ca> http://pinicola.ca
>>>> ------------------------------------------------------------
>>>>
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> Taxacom mailing list
>>>> Taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
>>>> http://mailman.nhm.ku.edu/mailman/listinfo/taxacom
>>>>
>>>>     
>>>>       
>>>>         
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Taxacom mailing list
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>>>
>>>   
>>>     
>>>       
>>   
>>     
>
>
>   

-- 
____________________________________________

Alex Borisenko, Ph.D.
Curator of zoological collections
Biodiversity Institute of Ontario
University of Guelph
579 Gordon Street
Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1
Phone: +1 519 824-4120 ext. 54834
Fax: +1 519 824-5703
E-mail: aborisen at uoguelph.ca
http://www.dnabarcoding.ca/
http://www.barcodinglife.org/






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