[Taxacom] London - Systematics Association Lecture and AGM, 9thDec

Richard Jensen rjensen at saintmarys.edu
Thu Dec 3 07:46:07 CST 2009


Perhaps Darwin's biggest mistake was not being prescient. He failed to 
recognize the evolutioonary importance and role of such phenomena as 
genetic drift, bottlenecks, polyploidy, aneuploidy, translocations and 
epigenetic effects, etc. How could he have been so arrogant to propose a 
theory that was consistent only with what he observed in the world?

Dick J

Richard Jensen, Professor
Department of Biology
Saint Mary’s College
Notre Dame, IN 46556
Tel: 574-284-4674



John Grehan wrote:
> Darwin's biggest mistake was in his failure to recognize biogeographic
> patterns as historically informative. Against that, his gradualism
> (which lies at the core of molecular clock systematics) is just a
> sideshow.
>
> John Grehan
>
>   
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: taxacom-bounces at mailman.nhm.ku.edu [mailto:taxacom-
>> bounces at mailman.nhm.ku.edu] On Behalf Of James Cotton
>> Sent: Thursday, December 03, 2009 7:52 AM
>> To: taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
>> Subject: [Taxacom] London - Systematics Association Lecture and AGM,
>> 9thDec
>>
>> The Systematics Association
>> Annual General Meeting and President's lecture
>>
>> Gradualism: Darwin's biggest mistake?
>>
>> Prof. Richard Bateman - Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and University of
>> Birmingham
>>
>> The Linnean Society, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London
>> Wednesday 9th December 2009, 6 pm (following AGM at 5pm)
>>
>> The meeting is open to visitors. Wine will be served after the lecture
>> to members and guests. Please advertise this lecture as widely as you
>> can.
>> The associations' AGM will be held before the lecture at 5pm.
>>
>> Abstract: Although Darwin's many achievements have been justly lauded
>> worldwide during 2009, his repeated assertions that all evolutionary
>> change
>> is imperceptibly gradual have escaped serious criticism from modern
>> commentators. The evidence that gradual change results in speciation
>>     
> is
>   
>> circumstantial in even the best documented cases, and usually relies
>>     
> on
>   
>> inadequate assessments of fitness. In contrast, saltational mechanisms
>> requiring that radical and instantaneous phenotypic change leads
>> directly to
>> de facto speciation are still widely ridiculed in most biological
>> constituencies, despite accumulating evidence of their viability. This
>> lecture aims to redress the balance between gradual and non-gradual
>> evolutionary change.
>> _____________________________________________
>> James Cotton
>> School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
>> Queen Mary, University of London
>> +44 (0)207 882 3645
>> j.a.cotton at qmul.ac.uk
>> http://webspace.qmul.ac.uk/jacotton/index.html
>> http://www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk/staff/jamescotton.html
>> _____________________________________________
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>>
>> Taxacom Mailing List
>> Taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
>> http://mailman.nhm.ku.edu/mailman/listinfo/taxacom
>>
>> The Taxacom archive going back to 1992 may be searched with either of
>> these methods:
>>
>> (1) http://taxacom.markmail.org
>>
>> Or (2) a Google search specified as:
>> site:mailman.nhm.ku.edu/pipermail/taxacom  your search terms here
>>     
>
> _______________________________________________
>
> Taxacom Mailing List
> Taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
> http://mailman.nhm.ku.edu/mailman/listinfo/taxacom
>
> The Taxacom archive going back to 1992 may be searched with either of these methods:
>
> (1) http://taxacom.markmail.org
>
> Or (2) a Google search specified as:  site:mailman.nhm.ku.edu/pipermail/taxacom  your search terms here
>   




More information about the Taxacom mailing list