[Taxacom] Drosophila melanogaster name change?

Jim Croft jim.croft at gmail.com
Thu Apr 15 18:27:45 CDT 2010


Yes, the genus is the problem... always has been... and Linnaeus has a
lot to answer for...

Someone one told me that Cronquist described a genus as a bunch of
species that sort of look alike, which is about the most honest and
useful definition of it I have ever heard.

Unfortunately I can not find the actual quotation in a quick internet
search, and it may even be apocryphal.  Has anyone seen it?  Got a
reference?

jim

On Fri, Apr 16, 2010 at 7:36 AM, Roderic Page <r.page at bio.gla.ac.uk> wrote:
> Is it just me, or will the real lesson be that identifiers (e.g., taxonomic
> names) that are designed to convey information on relationships (i.e., to
> which genus a species belongs) are fundamentally a very bad idea if our idea
> of relationship can change.
>
> I think the bright kids at school will ask how on Earth did we come up with
> such a fragile system?
>
> Regards
>
> Rod
>
> On 15 Apr 2010, at 22:05, Jim Croft wrote:
>
>> this name change is going to be the best thing that has happened to
>> taxonomy since Linnaeus.
>>
>> from now on, every school text book that mentions the most highly
>> studied organism in the planet will have to include an explanation on
>> scientific names an why they sometimes need to change.
>>
>> bring it on!
>>
>> jim
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Apr 16, 2010 at 12:15 AM, David Remsen (GBIF) <dremsen at gbif.org>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Some of my concerns regarding the ease of addressing this are:
>>>
>>> 1. Most people who reference scientific names are not familiar with
>>> the reality or the reasoning of name changes so wouldn't think of
>>> looking up a name change
>>
>> [... yada yada yada yada deleted :) ]
>>
>> jim
>>
>> --
>> _________________
>> Jim Croft ~ jim.croft at gmail.com ~ +61-2-62509499 ~
>> http://www.google.com/profiles/jim.croft
>> 'A civilized society is one which tolerates eccentricity to the point
>> of doubtful sanity.'
>> - Robert Frost, poet (1874-1963)
>>
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>
> ---------------------------------------------------------
> Roderic Page
> Professor of Taxonomy
> DEEB, FBLS
> Graham Kerr Building
> University of Glasgow
> Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK
>
> Email: r.page at bio.gla.ac.uk
> Tel: +44 141 330 4778
> Fax: +44 141 330 2792
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>
>
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>
>
>
>



-- 
_________________
Jim Croft ~ jim.croft at gmail.com ~ +61-2-62509499 ~
http://www.google.com/profiles/jim.croft
'A civilized society is one which tolerates eccentricity to the point
of doubtful sanity.'
 - Robert Frost, poet (1874-1963)




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