[Taxacom] North American endemics

Eric or Pat Metzler spruance at beyondbb.com
Sun Dec 11 08:57:50 CST 2011


I think a great many species of moths in North America meet your 
requirements.  Some species in the noctuid genus Protogygia are know to 
be restricted to dunes, each species to a single dunes system, whereas 
other in the genus are widespread.  Reference: Lafontaine JD (2004)  The 
Moths of North America Including Greenland, Fascicle 27.1, Noctuoidea 
Noctuidae (part) Noctuinae (part - Agrotini).  The Wedge Entomological 
Research Foundation, Washington, DC,  385 pp.

I'm now doing a study of moths for White Sands National Monument in 
southern New Mexico.  In the first four years I found 14 undescribed 
species of moths, several are endemic to the white sands ecosystem, and 
several of them are white.  Four of the new species, all with more 
widespread siblings, were published:  Protogygia whitesandensis, Euxoa 
lafontainei, Aleptina arenaria, Schinia poguei.  You can download the 
papers at:
http://www.pensoft.net/journal_home_page.php?journal_id=1&page=article&SESID=08aa0e6d3ddef39e1b380f6a51f0c9b7&type=show&article_id=182&issue_id=9&ttar=da&search=Protogygia%20whitesandsensis&IN=Journals&TIP=&Image100_x=0&Image100_y=0&
http://www.pensoft.net/journals/zookeys/article/1517/abstract/the-lepidoptera-of-white-sands-national-monument-otero-county-new-mexico-usa-3-a-new-species-of-aleptina-dyar-1902-lepid 

http://www.pensoft.net/journals/zookeys/article/1518/abstract/the-lepidoptera-of-white-sands-national-monument-otero-county-new-mexico-usa-4-a-new-species-of-schinia-h 

More descriptions of moths from White Sands are in manuscript.

 From my stand point Darwin got it right.

Best wishes from sunny, and very dry, southern New Mexico, USA.

Eric

-- 
Eric or Pat Metzler
P.O. Box 45
Alamogordo NM 88311-0045 US
metzlere at msu.edu
https://sites.google.com/a/beyondbb.com/metzler/eric-cv



On 12/11/2011 1:50 AM, Michael Heads wrote:
> I'm interested in local or regional endemics from America north of Mexico whose sister groups are widespread globally. So far I know of three, the seagull Larus heermanni, the stick insect Timema, and the plant California, all from in and around California. I'd be very interested to hear about any others.
>   
> Michael Heads
>
> Wellington, New Zealand.
>
>
> My papers on biogeography are at: http://tiny.cc/RiUE0
> Information on my new book, 'Molecular panbiogeography of the tropics', is at: http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520271968
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