[Taxacom] a question of Latin ...

Michael Heads m.j.heads at gmail.com
Thu Aug 2 00:22:57 CDT 2012


Hi Mark,

Do you have a reference for that, or a name of the source if it's a pers.
comm.?

(The point was really that biologists in the 18th and 19th centuries knew
their Latin).

Michael

On Thu, Aug 2, 2012 at 5:08 PM, Mark WIlden <mark at mwilden.com> wrote:

> On Aug 1, 2012, at 9:41 PM, Michael Heads <m.j.heads at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > . Frederick Smith
> > (British Museum, President of the Royal Entomological Society, Darwin
> > correspondent etc.) named Prolasius advenus and Cabro advenus. (He was
> the
> > first entomologist to publish descriptions of more than a hundred ant
> > species that still hold validity).
>
> Smith's work was of such low quality that one myrmecological giant said
> that "it would have been better if he had never seen an ant".
>
> ///ark
> Mark Wilden
> California Academy of Sciences
> www.antcat.org
>
>
> > Amos Eaton (who taught James Dwight
> > Dana, Asa Gray, John Torrey etc.) named the fly Telmatoscopus advenus.
> > Vernon Kellogg, professor of entomology at Stanford for 26 years (he
> taught
> > the scientist president Herbert Hoover) named the louse Rallicola
> adventus.
> > Baron Karl-Robert von Osten-Sacken was the Russian consul general in New
> > York in the American civil war, and is also known as an entomologist (he
> > introduced the trem chaetotaxy); he named the tephritid Torymus advenus
> > Alcide d'Orbigny, the well-known student of Cuvier, named the foram
> > Cibicides advenus.
> > Michael
> >
> > On Thu, Aug 2, 2012 at 3:27 PM, Stephen Thorpe
> > <stephen_thorpe at yahoo.co.nz>wrote:
> >
> >> well, just because you can find binomials which use advenus doesn't mean
> >> that they are correct -  it could be a common mistake ...
> >>
> >> Brown (1956) Composition of Scientific Words makes no reference to
> anyadjectival advenus ...
> >>
> >> Stephen
> >>
> >>  *From:* Michael Heads <m.j.heads at gmail.com>
> >> *To:* Curtis Clark <lists at curtisclark.org>
> >> *Cc:* Taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
> >> *Sent:* Thursday, 2 August 2012 2:46 PM
> >> *Subject:* Re: [Taxacom] a question of Latin ...
> >>
> >> Hi Stephen and Curtis,
> >>
> >> It seems to be a bit more complicated than that. In classical Latin
> >> 'advena' was used mainly (only?) as a noun in apposition. It's also used
> >> this way in many binomials (e.g. the beetle Ahasverus advena).
> >>
> >> But in a great many binomials it has been used as an adjective - a quick
> >> Google search revealed genera with masculine names in plants,
> Coleoptera,
> >> Diptera, Hymenoptera, Homoptera, Phthiraptera, fishes, birds and mammals
> >> that include species named 'advenus'. Lewis and Short (still the
> standard
> >> reference for later Latin) lists 'advena' as both a noun and an
> adjective.
> >>
> >> So, no need to change all the names with advenus.
> >> Michael Heads
> >> On Thu, Aug 2, 2012 at 12:27 PM, Curtis Clark <lists at curtisclark.org>
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >>> On 8/1/2012 4:56 PM, Stephen Thorpe wrote:
> >>>> Does anyone know if the specific epithet advena is unchangeable when
> >> the
> >>> gender of the genus changes? In other words, is there such an epithet
> as
> >>> advenus?
> >>>
> >>> It's a noun in apposition, so it would always be advena. The
> >>> corresponding adjective seems to be adventicius.
> >>>
> >>> --
> >>> Curtis Clark        http://www.csupomona.edu/~jcclark
> >>> After 2012-01-02:
> >>> Biological Sciences                  +1 909 869 4140
> >>> Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona CA 91768
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> _______________________________________________
> >>>
> >>> Taxacom Mailing List
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> >>>
> >>> The Taxacom archive going back to 1992 may be searched with either of
> >>> these methods:
> >>>
> >>> (1) by visiting http://taxacom.markmail.org/
> >>
> >>>
> >>> (2) a Google search specified as:  site:
> >>> mailman.nhm.ku.edu/pipermail/taxacom  your search terms here
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> Wellington, New Zealand.
> >>
> >> My new book: *Molecular panbiogeography of the tropics. *University
> >> of California Press, Berkeley.
> >>
> >> _______________________________________________
> >>
> >> Taxacom Mailing List
> >> Taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
> >> http://mailman.nhm.ku.edu/mailman/listinfo/taxacom
> >>
> >> The Taxacom archive going back to 1992 may be searched with either of
> >> these methods:
> >>
> >> (1) by visiting http://taxacom.markmail.org/
> >>
> >>
> >> (2) a Google search specified as:  site:
> >> mailman.nhm.ku.edu/pipermail/taxacom  your search terms here
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> > --
> > Wellington, New Zealand.
> >
> > My new book: *Molecular panbiogeography of the tropics. *University
> > of California Press, Berkeley.
> > _______________________________________________
> >
> > Taxacom Mailing List
> > Taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
> > http://mailman.nhm.ku.edu/mailman/listinfo/taxacom
> >
> > The Taxacom archive going back to 1992 may be searched with either of
> these methods:
> >
> > (1) by visiting http://taxacom.markmail.org
> >
> > (2) a Google search specified as:  site:
> mailman.nhm.ku.edu/pipermail/taxacom  your search terms here
>



-- 
Wellington, New Zealand.

My new book: *Molecular panbiogeography of the tropics. *University
of California Press, Berkeley.



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