[Taxacom] Type specimen

Juan Francisco Araya jfaraya at u.uchile.cl
Sat May 18 00:20:57 CDT 2013


Hello to all:

Recently I came across this question on the ICZN website, they answer it
here:

http://iczn.org/content/who-type-homo-sapiens

And they link this discussion to a paper:

http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/4065043?uid=2&uid=4&sid=21102297904197

Hope it helps,

Regards,

Juan Francisco.


2013/5/17 Stephen Thorpe <stephen_thorpe at yahoo.co.nz>

> I repeat: there is no type series for Homo sapiens. There is no holotype,
> and there can be no lectotype. Linnaeus partitioned H. sapiens into named
> races, with no nominotypical race ...
>
> Stephen
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: Doug Yanega <dyanega at ucr.edu>
> To: taxacom <TAXACOM at MAILMAN.NHM.KU.EDU>
> Sent: Saturday, 18 May 2013 1:23 PM
> Subject: Re: [Taxacom] Type specimen
>
>
> On 5/17/13 6:05 PM, Stephen Thorpe wrote:
> > Actually, no! There can be no type series for Homo sapiens. Linnaeus
> > split it up into named variants, which left no room for "typical" H.
> > sapiens. No specimens qualify for type status. The availability of the
> > name is unaffected, however ...
> >
> Homo sapiens sapiens is defined via all the descriptions (from something
> like 5 pages of text) NOT explicitly assigned to any of his 6
> availably-named subgroups; as such, even though there were no explicitly
> included specimens, his own person is implied as the specimen so
> described. This is the basic conclusion that David Notton has put forth
> elsewhere, with the exception that he claimed Linnaeus was a lectotype
> (which is impossible, given that there were no other included
> specimens). If one chooses to claim that every human being Linnaeus met
> during his lifetime was a syntype, then the same logic would apply to
> every cat, dog, horse, chicken, sparrow, etc. that Linnaeus saw prior to
> publishing. That's why the wording of 72.4 is so important; it does not
> matter how many humans Linnaeus saw in his leftime, only how many he
> included when writing his description - and since most of those were
> described as variants, they are also (by definition) excluded. The only
> specimen left to represent saapiens sapiens is Linnaeus.
>
> --
> Doug Yanega      Dept. of Entomology      Entomology Research Museum
> Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314    skype: dyanega
> phone: (951) 827-4315 (disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
>               http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
>   "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
>         is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82
>
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