[Taxacom] Protist systematics

Dan Lahr dlahr at ib.usp.br
Thu Jan 23 12:48:38 CST 2014


Hi Brian,

This is constantly changing, but you are correct in that some groups have
achieved some consensus.  Chromalveolata is not one of them, there is still
significant uncertainty in that territory.

The recommended literature in terms of classification is the compendium by
Sina Adl and many collaborators:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1550-7408.2012.00644.x/full

If you want something more neatly and deeply explained, Giselle Walker and
colleagues have recently written up a review that sums things up:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21320384

I must add that changes have not happened in the last decade or so.
Molecular data have simply confirmed beyond doubt that eukaryotes are much
more complicated than the 5 kingdoms.  Take a look at Whittaker's tree in
the 1969 paper and you will see that many of these groups are already
there.  There are still a lot more to be placed, a good source for people
who are interested in learning about uncertainty in protistan groups is
still Paddy's 1999 review:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10527921

Additionally, Juan Saldarriaga, at UBC-Canada, has a lot of material for
teaching in undergrad and grad courses about the "revolutions" in protistan
science -- http://botany.ubc.ca/people/juan-saldarriaga . His material is
great and I encourage you to get in contact with him if you are interested
in updating your lectures on protists.


I hope this was of some help,

Dan


__________________________________
Daniel J. G. Lahr
PhD, Assist. Prof.
Dept of Zoology, Univ. of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Office number: + 55 (11) 3091 0948
http://www.ib.usp.br/zoologia/lahr/



On Thu, Jan 23, 2014 at 12:28 PM, Patrick, Brian <brpatric at dwu.edu> wrote:

> Dear colleagues,
>
> The classification of protists has changed a great deal in the last decade
> or so.  Most introductory textbooks still refer to older classification
> systems because the protist classifications rapidly change.  However, there
> seems to be some growing consensus that at least a couple of new kingdoms
> have been introduced (e.g., Chromalveolata).
>
> Are there any papers that have addressed the higher level classifications
> of the protists?  If so, might someone suggest a few such papers?
>
> Thank you for your time!
>
> Best regards, Brian
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------
> L. Brian Patrick, Ph.D.
> Assistant Professor of Biology and Chair
> Department of Biological Sciences
> Dakota Wesleyan University
> 1200 W. University Ave.
> Mitchell, SD  57301
>
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