[Taxacom] more dead bodies...

Gustavo S. Libardi gslibardi at gmail.com
Tue Oct 20 15:07:53 CDT 2015


Just making a point: I agree with Filardi and, as Francisco, belong to
those who have serious concerns to killing rare animals for scientific
purposes. I mean: things aren't mutually excludent.

Fillardi made a very detailed explanation of the situation on his article
(link from Orscar's message), if one considers there was previous demand of
such thing.

Of course, we have to deal with fallacies every single day in science.
Nevertheless we must not be afraid to assume the results of thousands
scientific studies that used specimens of scientific collections to produce
a very distinctive view of the biodiversity since Linnaeus. If a mining
company use this kind of argument (if an expert can kill a bird, we also
should be able to do it!), well, we must be very prepared to demonstrate
that both activities are very, very different...

To reduce the scientific collection of specimens as nothing more as
"killing individuals" is a misleading point of view.

2015-10-20 16:46 GMT-03:00 Francisco Welter-Schultes <fwelter at gwdg.de>:

> I do not agree with Filardi and belong to those who have serious concerns
> to killig rare animals for purposes of scientific study.
> I do not kill new species of terrestrial molluscs if I know they could be
> rare. The estimation of 1500 or 4000 birds is somewhat speculative and
> seems not be based on reliable results of a scientific study.
>
> It is also the global reputation of science that suffers. As zoologists we
> are widely recognised as experts, since we know more about these animals
> than most people do. We carry a special responsibility.
>
> Another undesired effect is that country authorities may enhance
> difficulties for scientific work in the last remaining reserves of nature,
> if more pressure is coming up to take such decisions. Field research is
> confronted with increasing problems.
>
> Mining companies who like to destroy nature could easily argue that the
> birds cannot be so rare if even experts kill them. It is usually those guys
> who have good contact to governments, not the scientists who could correct
> such arguments and explain them the details.
>
> Francisco
> University of Goettingen, Germany
>
>
> Am 20.10.2015 um 16:58 schrieb Oscar Vargas:
>
>> I agree with you Michael,
>>
>> And, as a community we should show our support with Filardi. I am
>> starting a hashtag in twitter #IstandwithFilardi, please join to the
>> support and try to explain the public the importance of museum specimens in
>> research and conservation.
>>
>> Please share Filardi’s article in social media
>>
>> https://www.audubon.org/news/why-i-collected-moustached-kingfisher
>>
>> If interested in re-tweeting my post:
>>
>> https://twitter.com/Oscarmvargash/status/656484193359171584
>>
>> Oscar
>>
>> ____________________________
>> Oscar Vargas
>> PhD Candidate
>> Graduate Program in Plant Biology
>> Integrative Biology, Stop C0930
>> 205 W 24th Street
>> The University of Texas at Austin
>> Austin, TX 78712
>> http://www.oscarmvargas.com/
>>
>> On Oct 20, 2015, at 2:34 AM, Michael Heads <m.j.heads at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Researcher for NY museum kills rare bird in name of science
>>> <
>>> http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/researcher-ny-museum-kills-rare-bird-science-article-1.2394167
>>> >*,
>>> draws outrage from PETA*
>>> www.nydailynews.com/.../researcher-ny-museum-kills-rare-bird-science-art.
>>> ..
>>> Oct 12, 2015 - *Christopher Filardi*, Director of Pacific Programs at the
>>> American ... New York-based scientist *Christopher Filardi* after he
>>> discovered the...
>>>
>>> Poor Chris Filardi is getting the witch-hunt treatment for daring to
>>> collect a specimen. I saw the story first in the UK media, and this
>>> anti-collecting hysteria is also spreading in other countries. CF's work
>>> is
>>> first-rate and I quoted it several times in my last book, e.g. : 'the
>>> Solomon Islands have more endemic bird species than any other area of
>>> similar size in the world (Filardi and Smith, 2005)'. We should be
>>> supporting his  work, not stamping it out.
>>>
>>> Michael Heads
>>>
>>> --
>>> Dunedin, New Zealand.
>>>
>>> My books:
>>>
>>> Craw, R., J. Grehan, M. Heads. 1999. *Panbiogeography: Tracking the
>>> history
>>> of life*. Oxford University Press, New York.
>>> http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=Bm0_QQ3Z6GUC
>>> <
>>> http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=Bm0_QQ3Z6GUC&dq=panbiogeography&source=gbs_navlinks_s
>>> >
>>>
>>> Heads, M. 2012.* Molecular panbiogeography of the tropics. *University of
>>> California Press, Berkeley. www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520271968
>>>
>>> Heads, M. 2014.* Biogeography of Australasia:  A molecular analysis*.
>>> Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. www.cambridge.org/9781107041028
>>> _______________________________________________
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>>>
>>> Celebrating 28 years of Taxacom in 2015.
>>>
>> _______________________________________________
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>>
>> Celebrating 28 years of Taxacom in 2015.
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Taxacom Mailing List
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> http://mailman.nhm.ku.edu/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/taxacom
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> http://taxacom.markmail.org
>
> Celebrating 28 years of Taxacom in 2015.
>



-- 
|MSc. Gustavo Simões Libardi - "Napister"
|Biólogo e Mestre em Ciências (Universidade de São Paulo/Brasil)
|Becário Latinoamericano de Doctorado - CONICET/Argentina
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*"Tão grandes os empecilhos que a gigantesca e abundante mata virgem
apresenta contra sua destruição, e uma população ignorante, sem compreensão
de seu próprio interesse, conseguiu destruí-la completamente em uma parte
significante de sua extensão original." Peter W. Lund, 1837, em Lagoa
Santa, MG.*



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