[Taxacom] My revised classification of genus Homo (especially H. naledi)

Kenneth Kinman kinman at hotmail.com
Sun Jun 30 17:56:20 CDT 2019


Dear All,
       I have removed H. s. cepranensis as a subspecies, and it is now listed as a synonym of H. s. heidelbergensis.  This is based on a 2017 research paper in Nature (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-14437-2).
       More importantly, I have finally decided where to temporarily place Homo naledi (named in 2015).  I obviously do not believe that it merits full species status, and was even a bit tempted to place it as a synonym of either Homo erectus georgicus or of Homo erectus ergaster.
     However, the 2017 discovery that it was so unexpectedly young (roughly 250,000 years old), and yet has some very primitive features (mixed with some advanced features), would make it unwise to synonymize at this time.  From the original paper:  "This species combines a humanlike body size and stature with an australopith-sized brain; features of the shoulder and hand apparently well-suited for climbing with humanlike hand and wrist adaptations for manipulation; australopith-like hip mechanics with humanlike terrestrial adaptations of the foot and lower limb; small dentition with primitive dental proportions."
       Therefore, I am (at least temporarily) placing naledi as a subspecies between H. e. georgicus and H. e. ergaster.   Unless its primitive features display a very unusual mixture of reversals, Homo erectus naledi probably has a fairly lengthy unknown lineage that would take it back to the time of georgicus and ergaster.   I suppose some might even argue that it might even belong in Homo habilis.  Should be interesting to see what additional material might show, especially if such material dates to a much earlier time.  It could shake things up even more than it has already.
                         -------------Ken Kinman


1  Homo habilis%

               1   H. h. rudolfensis

              2A   H. h. habilis

              2B   H. h. floresiensis ("hobbit")

               3   {{H. erectus + H. sapiens}} (exgroup marker)



  _a_ Homo erectus%

               1  H. e. georgicus

              ?  H. e. naledi

               2  H. e. ergaster

               3  H. e. erectus%

             _a_  {{Homo sapiens}}  (exgroup marker)



   _a_ Homo sapiens

                1  H. s. antecessor

                2  H. s. heidelbergensis% (incl. cepranensis)

              _a_  H. s. neanderthalensis

                3  H. s. rhodesiensis

                4  H. s. idaltu

                5  H. s. sapiens

________________________________
From: Kenneth Kinman <kinman at hotmail.com>
Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2019 1:57 PM
To: taxacom
Subject: classification of archaic humans of Eurasia

Dear All,
           A new paper ("Neanderthal-Denisovan ancestors interbred with a distantly-related hominin") shows even more interbreeding of Neanderthals, Denisovans, and other archaic humans in Eurasia (long before modern humans spread into Eurasia).  I assume the scientific name for the "superarchaic" populations would be Homo sapiens heidelbergensis, and that Homo sapiens neanderthalensis (including Denisovans) is a late (and better known) offshoot of the superarchaics in general.
            Therefore, I continue to use the following classification, with a paraphyletic (%) H. s. heidenbergensis giving rise to H. s. neanderthalensis:

  1  Homo habilis%

               1   H. h. rudolfensis

              2A   H. h. habilis

              2B   H. h. floresiensis ("hobbit")

               3   {{H. erectus + H. sapiens}} (exgroup marker)



  _a_ Homo erectus%

               1  H. e. georgicus

               2  H. e. ergaster

               3  H. e. erectus

             _a_  {{Homo sapiens}}  (exgroup marker)



   _a_ Homo sapiens

               1A  H. s. antecessor

               1B  H. s. cepranensis

                2  H. s. heidelbergensis%

              _a_  H. s. neanderthalensis

                3  H. s. rhodesiensis

                4  H. s. idaltu

                5  H. s. sapiens


Weblink to the new paper:
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/657247v1

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