[Taxacom] Taxacom Digest, Vol 157, Issue 11

JF Mate aphodiinaemate at gmail.com
Thu May 30 19:50:41 CDT 2019


"The people heard it, and approved the doctrine, and immediately
practiced the contrary."

On Thu, 30 May 2019 at 11:52, Carlos Alberto Martínez Muñoz via
Taxacom <taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu> wrote:
>
> Dear taxacomers,
> I think that we should have a rule of not allowing advertising of courses
> through this mailing list when such courses don't include pricing
> information. The practice is unfair and consumes additional time from all
> the readers, by making us click a link, read again and find exhorbitant
> prices at the very end of the page. Pricing is an essential information,
> just like course content, schedule, etc. On the other hand, with the Open
> Access revolution more and more open educational resources appear every
> year, including  massive open online courses (MOOC). Whenever you or your
> students need a course, it is useful to search for a MOOC first.
> Warm regards,
>
> --
> Carlos A. Martínez Muñoz
> Zoological Museum, Biodiversity Unit
> FI-20014 University of Turku
> Finland
> ResearchGate profile
> <https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Carlos_Martinez-Munoz>
> Publons profile
> <https://publons.com/author/1324309/carlos-alberto-martinez-munoz#profile>
> Myriapod Morphology and Evolution
> <https://www.facebook.com/groups/205802113162102/>
>
>
> El mié., 29 may. 2019 a las 20:00, <taxacom-request at mailman.nhm.ku.edu>
> escribió:
>
> > Daily News from the Taxacom Mailing List
> >
> > When responding to a message, please do not copy the entire digest into
> > your reply.
> > ____________________________________
> >
> >
> > Today's Topics:
> >
> >    1. More fairy tales from evolution (John Grehan)
> >    2. Re: More fairy tales from evolution (Kenneth Kinman)
> >    3. Re: More fairy tales from evolution (John Grehan)
> >    4. Writing for Impact and Influence: An AIBS Professional
> >       Development Program (Jyotsna Pandey)
> >
> >
> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Message: 1
> > Date: Tue, 28 May 2019 14:52:44 -0400
> > From: John Grehan <calabar.john at gmail.com>
> > To: taxacom <taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu>
> > Subject: [Taxacom] More fairy tales from evolution
> > Message-ID:
> >         <
> > CADN0ud00HOd5S3sKV7DfdHgdpc3RTSkM9geQsTTnas4LjMiC8w at mail.gmail.com>
> > Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
> >
> > Evolution is definitely not a science. Its all about fairy tails (pun
> > intended). Here's the latest. The sooner we get honest to good fairy tails
> > (Creationism) in our schools the better. At least they are honest about
> > miracles. Good grief.
> >
> >
> > https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/exploding-stars-led-to-humans-walking-on-two-legs-radical-study-suggests/ar-AAC25BS?li=BBnbcA1
> >
> >
> > According to the researchers, a series of stars in our corner of the Milky
> > Way exploded in a cosmic riot that began about 7m years ago and continued
> > for millions of years more. The supernovae blasted powerful cosmic rays in
> > all directions. On Earth, the radiation arriving from the cataclysmic
> > explosions peaked about 2.6m years ago.
> >
> > The surge of radiation triggered a chain of events, the scientists argue.
> > As cosmic rays battered the planet, they ionised the atmosphere and made it
> > more conductive. This could have ramped up the frequency of lightning
> > strikes, sending wildfires raging through African forests, and making way
> > for grasslands, they write in the Journal of Geology. With fewer trees at
> > hand in the aftermath, our ancient ancestors adapted, and those who walked
> > upright thrived.
> >
> > That, at least, is the thinking. In the history of human evolution, walking
> > upright dates back at least 6m years to Sahelanthropus, an ancient species
> > with both ape and human features discovered from fossil remains found in
> > Chad. One prominent theory is that climate change transformed the
> > landscape, leaving savannah where trees once stood.
> >
> > One of the study’s authors, Adrian Melott of the University of Kansas, said
> > ancient human relatives were already dabbling with standing upright before
> > the effects of any supernovae took hold. But he believes the violent
> > explosions still played a role. “Bipedalism had already gotten started, but
> > we think this may have given it a strong shot in the arm,” he said.
> >
> > “Lightning has long been thought to be the primary cause of fires before
> > humans had a role, and with a lot of fires you get the destruction of a lot
> > of habitat,” Melott said. “When the forests are replaced with grasslands,
> > it then becomes an advantage to stand upright, so you can walk from tree to
> > tree, and see over the tall grass for predators.”
> >
> > The cosmic rays from one star known to have exploded about 164 light years
> > from Earth would have increased the ionisation of the atmosphere 50-fold,
> > the scientists calculate. Cosmic rays ionise the atmosphere when they knock
> > electrons out of the atoms and molecules they slam into in the air. Cosmic
> > rays normally only ionise the upper reaches of the atmosphere, but powerful
> > ones from nearby supernovae can penetrate the entire depth of the
> > atmosphere, ionising it all the way to the ground. “We are sure this would
> > have increased lightning strikes, but lightning initiation is not well
> > understood, so we cannot put a number on it,” Melott said.
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Message: 2
> > Date: Tue, 28 May 2019 23:12:18 +0000
> > From: Kenneth Kinman <kinman at hotmail.com>
> > To: taxacom <taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu>, John Grehan
> >         <calabar.john at gmail.com>
> > Subject: Re: [Taxacom] More fairy tales from evolution
> > Message-ID:
> >         <
> > CY4PR11MB148093AA2BF77687094D1144C11E0 at CY4PR11MB1480.namprd11.prod.outlook.com
> > >
> >
> > Content-Type: text/plain; charset="Windows-1252"
> >
> > Hi John,
> >        Some press coverage seems to love the hypotheses of Dr. Melott and
> > colleagues.  A couple of years ago it was about such bursts of cosmic
> > radiation (muons in particular) causing an extinction of marine megafauna
> > at the end of the Pliocene.  And another hypothesis that the increase in
> > mutation rates caused disparities between molecular clocks and the fossil
> > record.  Here are just three examples (in the first one he suggests "due to
> > the importance of highly penetrating muon irradiation, the disparity should
> > be magnified for megafauna"):
> >
> >      (1)  "A Possible Role for Stochastic Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation
> > Events in the Systematic Disparity between Molecular and Fossil Dates."
> >      https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/ast.2016.1527
> >
> >     (2)  "Muon Radiation Dose and Marine Megafaunal Extinction at the
> > end-Pliocene Supernova":
> > https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/240093v1.full
> >
> >     (3)  "Researchers consider whether supernovae killed off large ocean
> > animals at dawn of Pleistocene":
> > https://phys.org/news/2018-12-supernovae-large-ocean-animals-dawn.html
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: Taxacom <taxacom-bounces at mailman.nhm.ku.edu> on behalf of John
> > Grehan via Taxacom <taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu>
> > Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2019 1:52 PM
> > To: taxacom
> > Subject: [Taxacom] More fairy tales from evolution
> >
> > Evolution is definitely not a science. Its all about fairy tails (pun
> > intended). Here's the latest. The sooner we get honest to good fairy tails
> > (Creationism) in our schools the better. At least they are honest about
> > miracles. Good grief.
> >
> >
> > https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/exploding-stars-led-to-humans-walking-on-two-legs-radical-study-suggests/ar-AAC25BS?li=BBnbcA1
> >
> >
> > According to the researchers, a series of stars in our corner of the Milky
> > Way exploded in a cosmic riot that began about 7m years ago and continued
> > for millions of years more. The supernovae blasted powerful cosmic rays in
> > all directions. On Earth, the radiation arriving from the cataclysmic
> > explosions peaked about 2.6m years ago.
> >
> > The surge of radiation triggered a chain of events, the scientists argue.
> > As cosmic rays battered the planet, they ionised the atmosphere and made it
> > more conductive. This could have ramped up the frequency of lightning
> > strikes, sending wildfires raging through African forests, and making way
> > for grasslands, they write in the Journal of Geology. With fewer trees at
> > hand in the aftermath, our ancient ancestors adapted, and those who walked
> > upright thrived.
> >
> > That, at least, is the thinking. In the history of human evolution, walking
> > upright dates back at least 6m years to Sahelanthropus, an ancient species
> > with both ape and human features discovered from fossil remains found in
> > Chad. One prominent theory is that climate change transformed the
> > landscape, leaving savannah where trees once stood.
> >
> > One of the study’s authors, Adrian Melott of the University of Kansas, said
> > ancient human relatives were already dabbling with standing upright before
> > the effects of any supernovae took hold. But he believes the violent
> > explosions still played a role. “Bipedalism had already gotten started, but
> > we think this may have given it a strong shot in the arm,” he said.
> >
> > “Lightning has long been thought to be the primary cause of fires before
> > humans had a role, and with a lot of fires you get the destruction of a lot
> > of habitat,” Melott said. “When the forests are replaced with grasslands,
> > it then becomes an advantage to stand upright, so you can walk from tree to
> > tree, and see over the tall grass for predators.”
> >
> > The cosmic rays from one star known to have exploded about 164 light years
> > from Earth would have increased the ionisation of the atmosphere 50-fold,
> > the scientists calculate. Cosmic rays ionise the atmosphere when they knock
> > electrons out of the atoms and molecules they slam into in the air. Cosmic
> > rays normally only ionise the upper reaches of the atmosphere, but powerful
> > ones from nearby supernovae can penetrate the entire depth of the
> > atmosphere, ionising it all the way to the ground. “We are sure this would
> > have increased lightning strikes, but lightning initiation is not well
> > understood, so we cannot put a number on it,” Melott said.
> > _______________________________________________
> > Taxacom Mailing List
> >
> > Send Taxacom mailing list submissions to: taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
> > For list information; to subscribe or unsubscribe, visit:
> > http://mailman.nhm.ku.edu/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/taxacom
> > You can reach the person managing the list at:
> > taxacom-owner at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
> > The Taxacom email archive back to 1992 can be searched at:
> > http://taxacom.markmail.org
> >
> > Nurturing nuance while assaulting ambiguity for 32 some years, 1987-2019.
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Message: 3
> > Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 06:24:12 -0400
> > From: John Grehan <calabar.john at gmail.com>
> > To: Kenneth Kinman <kinman at hotmail.com>
> > Cc: taxacom <taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu>
> > Subject: Re: [Taxacom] More fairy tales from evolution
> > Message-ID:
> >         <
> > CADN0ud2k7vF3gScDc84ZDZQ_OttK4iRxB_nYyWzEER5WPjrBkQ at mail.gmail.com>
> > Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
> >
> > Not surprising that the press love such things. Quite dramatic to have the
> > universe play a direct role in our evolution this way. Unlike the
> > imagination involved in the bipedal hypothesis (this was the fairly tale
> > part), extinctions are a matter of record. But one has to wonder sometimes
> > about invoking astronomical events as they are going on all the time and
> > one or other is going to coincide. Then one has to explain how the
> > extinction was only selective.
> >
> > John Grehan
> >
> >
> >
> > On Tue, May 28, 2019 at 7:12 PM Kenneth Kinman <kinman at hotmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > > Hi John,
> > >        Some press coverage seems to love the hypotheses of Dr. Melott and
> > > colleagues.  A couple of years ago it was about such bursts of cosmic
> > > radiation (muons in particular) causing an extinction of marine megafauna
> > > at the end of the Pliocene.  And another hypothesis that the increase in
> > > mutation rates caused disparities between molecular clocks and the fossil
> > > record.  Here are just three examples (in the first one he suggests "due
> > to
> > > the importance of highly penetrating muon irradiation, the disparity
> > should
> > > be magnified for megafauna"):
> > >
> > >      (1)  "A Possible Role for Stochastic Astrophysical Ionizing
> > Radiation
> > > Events in the Systematic Disparity between Molecular and Fossil Dates."
> > >      https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/ast.2016.1527
> > >
> > >     (2)  "Muon Radiation Dose and Marine Megafaunal Extinction at the
> > > end-Pliocene Supernova":
> > > https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/240093v1.full
> > >
> > >     (3)  "Researchers consider whether supernovae killed off large ocean
> > > animals at dawn of Pleistocene":
> > > https://phys.org/news/2018-12-supernovae-large-ocean-animals-dawn.html
> > >
> > >
> > > ------------------------------
> > > *From:* Taxacom <taxacom-bounces at mailman.nhm.ku.edu> on behalf of John
> > > Grehan via Taxacom <taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu>
> > > *Sent:* Tuesday, May 28, 2019 1:52 PM
> > > *To:* taxacom
> > > *Subject:* [Taxacom] More fairy tales from evolution
> > >
> > > Evolution is definitely not a science. Its all about fairy tails (pun
> > > intended). Here's the latest. The sooner we get honest to good fairy
> > tails
> > > (Creationism) in our schools the better. At least they are honest about
> > > miracles. Good grief.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/exploding-stars-led-to-humans-walking-on-two-legs-radical-study-suggests/ar-AAC25BS?li=BBnbcA1
> > >
> > >
> > > According to the researchers, a series of stars in our corner of the
> > Milky
> > > Way exploded in a cosmic riot that began about 7m years ago and continued
> > > for millions of years more. The supernovae blasted powerful cosmic rays
> > in
> > > all directions. On Earth, the radiation arriving from the cataclysmic
> > > explosions peaked about 2.6m years ago.
> > >
> > > The surge of radiation triggered a chain of events, the scientists argue.
> > > As cosmic rays battered the planet, they ionised the atmosphere and made
> > it
> > > more conductive. This could have ramped up the frequency of lightning
> > > strikes, sending wildfires raging through African forests, and making way
> > > for grasslands, they write in the Journal of Geology. With fewer trees at
> > > hand in the aftermath, our ancient ancestors adapted, and those who
> > walked
> > > upright thrived.
> > >
> > > That, at least, is the thinking. In the history of human evolution,
> > walking
> > > upright dates back at least 6m years to Sahelanthropus, an ancient
> > species
> > > with both ape and human features discovered from fossil remains found in
> > > Chad. One prominent theory is that climate change transformed the
> > > landscape, leaving savannah where trees once stood.
> > >
> > > One of the study’s authors, Adrian Melott of the University of Kansas,
> > said
> > > ancient human relatives were already dabbling with standing upright
> > before
> > > the effects of any supernovae took hold. But he believes the violent
> > > explosions still played a role. “Bipedalism had already gotten started,
> > but
> > > we think this may have given it a strong shot in the arm,” he said.
> > >
> > > “Lightning has long been thought to be the primary cause of fires before
> > > humans had a role, and with a lot of fires you get the destruction of a
> > lot
> > > of habitat,” Melott said. “When the forests are replaced with grasslands,
> > > it then becomes an advantage to stand upright, so you can walk from tree
> > to
> > > tree, and see over the tall grass for predators.”
> > >
> > > The cosmic rays from one star known to have exploded about 164 light
> > years
> > > from Earth would have increased the ionisation of the atmosphere 50-fold,
> > > the scientists calculate. Cosmic rays ionise the atmosphere when they
> > knock
> > > electrons out of the atoms and molecules they slam into in the air.
> > Cosmic
> > > rays normally only ionise the upper reaches of the atmosphere, but
> > powerful
> > > ones from nearby supernovae can penetrate the entire depth of the
> > > atmosphere, ionising it all the way to the ground. “We are sure this
> > would
> > > have increased lightning strikes, but lightning initiation is not well
> > > understood, so we cannot put a number on it,” Melott said.
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > Taxacom Mailing List
> > >
> > > Send Taxacom mailing list submissions to: taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
> > > For list information; to subscribe or unsubscribe, visit:
> > > http://mailman.nhm.ku.edu/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/taxacom
> > > You can reach the person managing the list at:
> > > taxacom-owner at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
> > > The Taxacom email archive back to 1992 can be searched at:
> > > http://taxacom.markmail.org
> > >
> > > Nurturing nuance while assaulting ambiguity for 32 some years, 1987-2019.
> > >
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Message: 4
> > Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 12:31:09 -0400
> > From: Jyotsna Pandey <jpandey at aibs.org>
> > To: taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
> > Subject: [Taxacom] Writing for Impact and Influence: An AIBS
> >         Professional    Development Program
> > Message-ID:
> >         <CAOuC=
> > 0GsJP7wVF_WQZKVhstcfnsobVwdN3xxpE-LeL+4cqvmQw at mail.gmail.com>
> > Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
> >
> > Dear Colleague,
> >
> > There is a growing recognition of the importance of providing graduate
> > students and postdoctoral fellows with professional development training
> > that will expand their career opportunities and potential for professional
> > success.  The American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is pleased
> > to announce a professional development program that we have developed to
> > help scientists strengthen their written communication skills.
> >
> > This is an important professional development training opportunity.  I hope
> > you will consider sharing this opportunity with your students, staff, and
> > colleagues.
> >
> > Below are more specific details about this online course, including
> > registration information.
> >
> > *Writing for Impact and Influence: An AIBS Professional Development
> > Program*
> >
> > *It is perfectly okay to write garbage—as long as you edit brilliantly. *
> > -C. J. Cherryh
> >
> > The American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) has heard a common
> > refrain from faculty, scientists, government and private sector executives,
> > and everyone in between: Scientists are losing the ability to communicate
> > effectively in writing. The concern is not just about how well a scientific
> > manuscript is drafted, but also about how routine business and public
> > engagement information are communicated.
> >
> > AIBS is responding by re-offering our professional development program
> > designed to help scientists, including graduate students, hone their
> > written communication skills to increase the impact and influence of their
> > message. This course complements AIBS's highly successful Communications
> > Boot Camp for Scientists, which focuses on oral communication.
> >
> > Writing for Impact and Influence provides practical instruction and
> > hands-on exercises that will improve the participant's general writing
> > proficiency. The program will provide participants with the skills and
> > tools needed to compose scientific press releases, blog posts, emails, and
> > memoranda, with a focus on the reader experience. Each product-oriented
> > session will have an assignment to be completed independently, with
> > feedback from the instructor. The course is interactive, and participants
> > are encouraged to ask questions and exchange ideas with the instructor and
> > other participants.
> >
> > *Who Should Take the Course?*
> >
> >    - Individuals interested in furthering their professional development by
> >    augmenting their writing skills.
> >    - Graduate students and early-career professionals interested in
> >    increasing their marketability to employers.
> >    - Individuals interested in more effectively informing and influencing
> >    segments of the public, supervisors, policymakers, reporters,
> >    organizational leaders, and others.
> >
> > *Topics*
> >
> >    - Press releases and writing for the media
> >    - Blogging and social media campaigns
> >    - E-Correspondence and writing for professional audiences
> >    - One-pagers and writing for stakeholders
> >    - Action/decision memoranda and writing for diverse professional
> >    audiences
> >    - Synthesis
> >    - Participant Requirements
> >    - Internet access, email account, and computer audio and video
> >    capabilities.
> >
> > *Course Structure*
> > The course consists of six 90-minute online modules conducted live and
> > subsequently archived online for participant review. Modules are spaced at
> > weekly intervals to allow time for assignment completion. Live attendance
> > is recommended but not required, and the instructor can be contacted by
> > email at any time during the course.
> >
> > *Assignments*
> > A writing assignment will be given in each of the first five courses.
> > Students will receive timely feedback on their assignments.
> >
> > *Certificate of Completion*
> > Individuals who actively participate in and complete the full course will
> > receive a certificate recognizing that they have completed a nine-hour
> > professional development course on business writing for scientists.
> >
> > *Schedule*
> > The course will begin on Thursday, 11 July 2019. The subsequent course
> > sessions will be held weekly on Thursdays, through 15 August. All live
> > courses will begin at 2:00 p.m. Eastern time. Recorded programs will be
> > available to participants after the live session.
> >
> > *Registration*
> > Space is limited and the course will be filled on a first-come,
> > first-served basis. Registration is required.
> >
> > To register for the course, go to http://io.aibs.org/writing
> >
> > For questions regarding the course please contact James Verdier at
> > jverdier at aibs.org.
> >
> > Sincerely,
> >
> > Jyotsna Pandey, Ph.D.
> > Public Policy Manager
> > American Institute of Biological Sciences
> > 1201 New York Avenue, NW, Suite 420
> > Washington, DC 20005
> > Phone: 202-628-1500 x 225
> > Email: jpandey at aibs.org
> > www.aibs.org
> > Follow us on Twitter! @AIBS_Policy
> >
> > --
> > This message is confidential and should only be read by its intended
> > recipients.
> > If you have received it in error, please notify the sender and
> > delete all copies.
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > Subject: Digest Footer
> >
> > Taxacom Mailing List
> >
> > Send Taxacom mailing list submissions to taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
> > For list information; to subscribe or unsubscribe, visit:
> > http://mailman.nhm.ku.edu/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/taxacom
> > You can reach the person managing the list at:
> > taxacom-owner at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
> > The Taxacom email archive back to 1992 can be searched at:
> > http://taxacom.markmail.org
> >
> > Nurturing nuance while assaulting ambiguity for 32 some years, 1987-2019.
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > End of Taxacom Digest, Vol 157, Issue 11
> > ****************************************
> >
> _______________________________________________
> Taxacom Mailing List
>
> Send Taxacom mailing list submissions to: taxacom at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
> For list information; to subscribe or unsubscribe, visit: http://mailman.nhm.ku.edu/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/taxacom
> You can reach the person managing the list at: taxacom-owner at mailman.nhm.ku.edu
> The Taxacom email archive back to 1992 can be searched at: http://taxacom.markmail.org
>
> Nurturing nuance while assaulting ambiguity for 32 some years, 1987-2019.


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