<html>
At 12:26 PM 12/22/01 +1300, you wrote:<br>
<blockquote type=cite cite>> In my case I do acknowledge that I have
had rejections<br>
> that have involved from a fair hearing as the reviewers identified
specific<br>
> problems rather than just being opposed to panbiogeography.<br>
<br>
Phew!  A momentous concession. Well done John.
:-)</blockquote><br>
Since the only intimation to the contrary came from Geoff Read it's not a
'concession' at all.<br>
<br>
<blockquote type=cite cite>> the problem with censorship arises when
the "normal" criteria of<br>
> evaluation tend to be left out as reviewers reject on a
philosophical<br>
> basis<br>
<br>
Do they? That's the crunch. Each time I've tried to suggest that
your<br>
reviewers may legitimately think  methods you use are the equivalent
of<br>
Thomas Lammers' 2+2 = 5 you come back with the "suppression of<br>
alternative approaches" argument.   On the other hand, if
you are<br>
correct, then I think those reviewers should have instead politely
declined<br>
to referee the MS.</blockquote><br>
Yes in the cases I am citing suppression of alternatives' was the factor.
As I am <br>
indeed correct, I agree that it would have  been more professional
for such <br>
reviewers to decline to referee the MS citing conflict of interest.<br>
<br>
<blockquote type=cite cite>Your comments hinting at the congealing of the
field of biogeography into<br>
factionalism (ugh!) suggest a possible partial solution to your
difficulties -<br>
your group should have your own journal.</blockquote><br>
Panbiogeography is accepted in a wide variety of reputable scientific
journals and<br>
publishers so having an exclusive journal is redundant. And just because
biogeography is a <br>
factionalized field there does not have to be suppression of competing
research programs. <br>
The problems of reviewer suppression of panbiogeography only arise where
reviewers are intent on preventing publication. One does not have to
engage in such activities just because one follows a particular
methodology. As I have emphasized before, I am not compelled to reject a
<br>
Darwinian center of origin and dispersal paper just because I am a
panbiogeographer. <br>
I would find such intent quite repulsive.<br>
<br>
If, in contrast, one take the view that science<br>
is all about wining at any price, then any action to reduce the profile,
impact, or opportunities<br>
of competing views may be deemed legitimate. While I have drawn attention
to the role of<br>
reviewer censorship of panbiogeography, this has only been a major
problem in New Zealand<br>
where opponents of panbiogeography have successfully used their reviewer
position to engage in <br>
suppression of panbiogeography in both publication and funding because
the editors and <br>
funding managers are willing to accept such suppression as legitimate. In
general, overseas<br>
journals and reviewers generally take a more professional approach,
although it can be said that<br>
some journals would be far less likely bets for acceptance of
panbiogeography than others.<br>
<br>
John Grehan<br>
</html>